Tag Archives: chapter books

Eliza Bluebell

By: A. J. York

Eliza Bluebell is a mysterious woman who arrived one day at this small town. The people of Blossom Brook weren’t sure what to make of her, especially after she bought the abandoned store and turned it into a bakery. Throughout her stay, Eliza and her rambunctious shadow help each and every neighbor.

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Filed under Children's Books, Fiction Books

My Sister’s Books Review #62

Magic Tree House Christmas in Camelot by Mary Pope Osbourne (Age Range: 7-9)

The Magic Tree House is a popular series for elementary school aged children. In this Christmas story Annie and Jack have been mysteriously invited to Camelot to Celebrate Christmas. However, when they get there, Camelot is under a dark, miserable spell. It is up to these Annie and Jack to go on a quest to find imagination and bring back joy to the kingdom. This is a fascinating story with easy to read sentences, ideal for kids who are transitioning into chapter books. There are a few black and white pictures to accompany the fast-paced story. This book will surely spark children’s imaginations.

Notes:

This review was written for Sasee Magazine and My Sister’s Books. To learn more about the Magazine and the Bookstore, please visit their sites by clicking on their names.

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Filed under Children's Books, My Sister's Books

Delilah Dusticle

By: A.J. York. Format: eBook. Read: December 2013.

Delilah Dusticle has the special ability to remove dust from every crevice in a home. She has worked for the Fenchurch-Whittington house since she was sixteen and despite the rules, she has fallen in love with Charlie Fenchurch-Whittington the third. Unfortunately for Delilah, he returns home from a business trip with a fiancee. Delilah becomes so depressed that her magical ability reverses and everything she touches is covered in dust, even her own hair. Shortly thereafter, Delilah is forced to find a new home and a new job, which is very difficult for a person who covers everything in dust. Will she be able to find happiness and regain her ability to remove dust? Or will she fade away into the shadows forever?

Delilah Dusticle is a very, cute, chapter book for children. The author does a wonderful job of showing the importance of self-worth and how the things you believe about yourself, will begin to take hold. There were several grammatical errors in this book, but overall the chapters are short and easy to read. The moral of the story is definitely one that everyone needs to be reminded of, often. The ending provides closure for the story, while setting it up nicely for a potential sequel. Recommended for the third-fifth grade age range.

I have to say, as an adult, I kind of would like a magic power that would conveniently remove all dust… that or clean all the dishes. Hmm… What magical cleaning ability would you like to have?

Enjoy!
~Ariesgrl

Notes:
The author provided a copy of this book for me to review. To learn more about this author and her work, please visit her website.

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Face-Off

By: Stacy Juba. Format: eBook. Read: September 2013.

T.J. McKendrick can’t do anything right to please his father, despite the fact that he attends a prep school and is top of his class and on several sports teams. His twin brother, Brad, feels that T.J. is the apple of their father’s eyes and despite all of his hard work, he can barely maintain a C average in his public school. Brad hates school, but is looking forward to the start of hockey season. That is until their parents inform them that they can no longer afford T.J.’s school and they will both be forced to attend the same high school. Now Brad fears loosing his friends and the all important Captain spot at the start of hockey season. Not to mention, their younger brother Chris seems to keep getting in trouble and their parents are always arguing which upsets their youngest brother Jory. Will the twins come together to help there younger brothers or will the competition for attention and acceptance destroy their relationship for good?

Stacy Juba originally wrote this book when she was a young teenager, yet readers will not believe that while reading this book. Fans of hockey will love every single detail that takes place on the ice and about the ice. Non-hockey loving fans will not have to worry about being confused by statistics or technical jargon, since it is quite clear that Juba wrote this for every reader to enjoy. Readers will be chuckling at the antics of the youngest brother Jory, while readers’ heartstrings will be caught up effects of the tumultuous relationship of the parents. Readers will be able to relate to Brad, T.J. and their younger brothers. The sudden ending will leave readers needing more, but there is a small excerpt from the book’s sequel. Juba’s excellent talent for balancing human emotion, hockey and high school will create instant fans in the readers.

I loved this book! First off, I am a huge hockey fan. (Born and raised cheering on the Washington Capitals.) Second, this book perfectly demonstrates the inner turmoil inside families, whether it is the side effects of parents fighting or sibling rivalries. Even with the abrupt ending, I would highly recommend this book to middle school children or adult fans of hockey/YA books.

Enjoy!
~Ariesgrl

Notes:
A copy of this book was provided for me to review. To learn more about this author and her work, please visit her website.

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Filed under Young Adult Books